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Planning Applications

Making a representation about a planning application

In order to write an effective objection to a planning application, it is important to link the impacts of the development proposal to Camden’s Local Plan policies, Camden Planning Guidance (CPG) and the London Plan.

Proposals frequently involve harm to the:

  • Amenity of neighbours, eg:
    – overlooking (Camden Policy A1)
    – loss of outlook (Camden Policy A1)
    – loss of natural daylight and sunlight (Camden Policy A1)
    – loss of privacy (Camden Policy A1)
    – noise and light pollution (Camden Policies A4 and A5)
  • Conservation area, eg:
    – loss of original building features (Camden Policy D2)
    – unsympathetic extensions and alterations (Camden Policy D2)
    – loss of traditional front boundary treatments, harm to the streetscape
    (Camden Policy D2)
    – loss of front, rear and side gardens (Camden Policies A3, CC2, D2)
    – loss of trees and hedges (Camden Policies A3, CC2, D2 and London
    Plan Policy G5).
    Trees, hedges and gardens are central to the character of the
    Redington Frognal Conservation Area:
    AECOM Contribution of Trees to the Townscape
  • Environment, eg:
    – loss of trees and hedges (Camden Policies A3, CC2, D2)
    – loss of biodiverse habitat / natural soft surface (Camden Policies A3,
    CC2, D2)
    Development is required to make a contribution to biodiversity
    (Camden Policy A3)
    – reduced ability of the ground to absorb surface water runoff (Camden
    Policies A5, CC2 and CC3)
    – diversion of underground water (Camden Policy CC3).

Camden Local Plan Policies
Camden Local Plan Policies are presented in text boxes with a blue background. The Policies which are most frequently cited in residential planning objections are:

  • A1 Managing the impact of development
  • A2 Open space
  • A3 Biodiversity
  • A4 Noise and vibration
  • A5 Basements
  • D1 Design
  • D2 Heritage
  • CC2 Adapting to climate change
  • T2 Parking and car-free development

These (and some others) have been extracted and can be found here:
Camden – Adoption version – key policies.pdf

Camden Planning Guidance should also be referred to:
https://www.camden.gov.uk/camden-planning-guidance?inheritRedirect=true

Redington Frognal Conservation Area Guidelines
The Redington Frognal Conservation Area Guidelines, at the back of the Redington Frognal Conservation Area Statement, may also be cited in support of objections.

These Guidelines, found on pages 28 to 37 of the Redington and Frognal CA Statement, are listed below:

  • RF1 Rear gardens
  • RF2 Basements
  • RF3 – RF6 Demolition
  • RF7 Estate agent boards
  • RF8 – RF9 Front gardens
  • RF10 – RF12 Listed buildings
  • RF13 – RF17 Materials and maintenance
  • RF18 – RF 21 New development
  • RF22 – RF26 Rear extensions and conservatories
  • RF27 – RF29 Roof extensions
  • RF30 Roof gardens
  • RF31 Satellite dishes
  • RF32 – RF33 Side extensions
  • RF34 – RF37 Trees and hedges

Draft London Plan

A number of policies in the London Plan are supportive of biodiversity and
green infrastructure:

Policy G5 Urban greening
The London Plan requires development to make a contribution to Urban
Greening:
https://www.london.gov.uk/what-we-do/planning/london-plan/newlondon-plan/draft-new-london-plan/chapter-8-green-infrastructure-andnatural-environment/policy-g5

Policy G6 Biodiversity and access to nature
This requires biodiversity enhancement to be considered from the start of the
development process:
https://www.london.gov.uk/what-we-do/planning/london-plan/newlondon-plan/draft-new-london-plan/chapter-8-green-infrastructure-andnatural-environment/policy-g6

Policy G7 Trees and woodlands
Existing trees of quality are to be retained, wherever possible. If it is imperative that trees have to be removed, there should be adequate replacement based on the existing value of the benefits of the trees removed, determined by, for example, i-tree or CAVAT. The planting of additional trees should generally be included in new developments – particularly large-canopied species which provide a wider range of benefits because of the larger surface area of their canopy
https://www.london.gov.uk/what-we-do/planning/london-plan/newlondon-plan/draft-new-london-plan/chapter-8-green-infrastructure-andnatural-environment/policy-g6

Hampstead Conservation Area Advisory Committee
Hampstead CAAC is a statutory consultee and advises Camden Council on general conservation policy and all planning applications and appeals in the Hampstead, Fitzjohns/Netherhall, Redington/Frognal and South Hill Park conservation areas. More information is available here:
cindex.camden.gov.uk/kb5/camden/cd/service.page?id=tyZRdxYKNYY